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Daoism -> Zhuangzi -> Outer Chapters -> Webbed Toes -> 1

A ligament uniting the big toe with the other toes and an extra finger
may be natural growths,
but they are more than is good for use.
Excrescences on the person and hanging tumours
are growths from the body,
but they are unnatural additions to it.
There are many arts of benevolence and righteousness,
and the exercise of them is distributed among the five viscera;
but this is not the correct method according to the characteristics of the Dao.
Thus it is that the addition to the foot
is but the attachment to it of so much useless flesh,
and the addition to the hand
is but the planting on it of a useless finger.
(So it is that) the connecting (the virtues) with the five viscera renders, by excess or restraint, the action of benevolence and righteousness bad,
and leads to many arts as in the employment of (great) powers of hearing or of vision.
Therefore an extraordinary power of vision
leads to the confusion of the five colours
and an excessive use of ornament.
(Its possessor), in the resplendence of his green and yellow, white and black, black and green,
will not stop till he has become a Li Zhu.
An extraordinary power of hearing
leads to a confusion of the five notes,
and an excessive use of the six musical accords.
(Its possessor), in bringing out the tones from the instruments of metal, stone, silk, and bamboo,
aided by the Huang-zhong and Da-lu (tubes),
师旷 will not stop till he has become a Shi Kuang.
(So), excessive benevolence
eagerly brings out virtues and restrains its (proper) nature, that (its possessor) may acquire a famous reputation,
使天下 and cause all the organs and drums in the world to celebrate an unattainable condition;
and he will not stop till he has become a Zeng (Shen) or a Shi (Qiu).
An extraordinary faculty in debating
leads to the piling up of arguments like a builder with his bricks, or a netmaker with his string. (Its possessor) cunningly contrives his sentences
and enjoys himself in discussing what hardness is and what whiteness is, where views agree and where they differ,
and pressing on, though weary, with short steps, with (a multitude of) useless words to make good his opinion;
nor will he stop till he has become a Yang (Zhu) or Mo (Di).
But in all these cases the parties, with their redundant and divergent methods,
天下 do not proceed by that which is the correct path for all under the sky.
That which is the perfectly correct path is not to lose the real character of the nature with which we are endowed.
Hence the union (of parts) should not be considered redundance,
nor their divergence superfluity;
what is long should not be considered too long,
nor what is short too short.
A duck's legs, for instance, are short,
but if we try to lengthen them, it occasions pain;
and a crane's legs are long,
but if we try to cut off a portion of them, it produces grief.
Where a part is by nature long, we are not to amputate,
or where it is by nature short, we are not to lengthen it.
There is no occasion to try to remove any trouble that it may cause.
The presumption is that benevolence and righteousness are not constituents of humanity;
for to how much anxiety does the exercise of them give rise!
Moreover when another toe is united to the great toe,
to divide the membrane makes you weep;
and when there is an extra finger,
to gnaw it off makes you cry out.
In the one case there is a member too many,
and in the other a member too few;
but the anxiety and pain which they cause is the same.
The benevolent men of the present age
look at the evils of the world, as with eyes full of dust, and are filled with sorrow by them,
while those who are not benevolent,
having violently altered the character of their proper nature, greedily pursue after riches and honours.
The presumption therefore is that benevolence and righteousness are contrary to the nature of man
天下- how full of trouble and contention has the world been ever since the three dynasties began!


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