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Scope: Gaozi I Request type: Paragraph
Condition 1: Contains text "万锺则不辨礼义而受之" Matched:1.
Total 1 paragraphs. Page 1 of 1.

告子上 - Gaozi I

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10 告子上:
孟子曰:“鱼,我所欲也;熊掌,亦我所欲也,二者不可得兼,舍鱼而取熊掌者也。生,亦我所欲也;义,亦我所欲也,二者不可得兼,舍生而取义者也。生亦我所欲,所欲有甚于生者,故不为苟得也;死亦我所恶,所恶有甚于死者,故患有所不辟也。如使人之所欲莫甚于生,则凡可以得生者,何不用也?使人之所恶莫甚于死者,则凡可以辟患者,何不为也?由是则生而有不用也,由是则可以辟患而有不为也。是故所欲有甚于生者,所恶有甚于死者,非独贤者有是心也,人皆有之,贤者能勿丧耳。一箪食,一豆羹,得之则生,弗得则死。嘑尔而与之,行道之人弗受;蹴尔而与之,乞人不屑也。万锺则不辨礼义而受之。万锺于我何加焉?为宫室之美、妻妾之奉、所识穷乏者得我与?乡为身死而不受,今为宫室之美为之;乡为身死而不受,今为妻妾之奉为之;乡为身死而不受,今为所识穷乏者得我而为之,是亦不可以已乎?此之谓失其本心。”
Gaozi I:
Mencius said, 'I like fish, and I also like bear's paws. If I cannot have the two together, I will let the fish go, and take the bear's paws. So, I like life, and I also like righteousness. If I cannot keep the two together, I will let life go, and choose righteousness. I like life indeed, but there is that which I like more than life, and therefore, I will not seek to possess it by any improper ways. I dislike death indeed, but there is that which I dislike more than death, and therefore there are occasions when I will not avoid danger. If among the things which man likes there were nothing which he liked more than life, why should he not use every means by which he could preserve it? If among the things which man dislikes there were nothing which he disliked more than death, why should he not do everything by which he could avoid danger? There are cases when men by a certain course might preserve life, and they do not employ it; when by certain things they might avoid danger, and they will not do them. Therefore, men have that which they like more than life, and that which they dislike more than death. They are not men of distinguished talents and virtue only who have this mental nature. All men have it; what belongs to such men is simply that they do not lose it. Here are a small basket of rice and a platter of soup, and the case is one in which the getting them will preserve life, and the want of them will be death; if they are offered with an insulting voice, even a tramper will not receive them, or if you first tread upon them, even a beggar will not stoop to take them. And yet a man will accept of ten thousand zhong, without any consideration of propriety or righteousness. What can the ten thousand chung add to him? When he takes them, is it not that he may obtain beautiful mansions, that he may secure the services of wives and concubines, or that the poor and needy of his acquaintance may be helped by him? In the former case the offered bounty was not received, though it would have saved from death, and now the emolument is taken for the sake of beautiful mansions. The bounty that would have preserved from death was not received, and the emolument is taken to get the service of wives and concubines. The bounty that would have saved from death was not received, and the emolument is taken that one's poor and needy acquaintance may be helped by him. Was it then not possible likewise to decline this? This is a case of what is called "Losing the proper nature of one's mind."'

Total 1 paragraphs. Page 1 of 1.