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Scope: Pre-Qin and Han Request type: Paragraph
Condition 1: Contains property "Academic references" Matched:13.
Total 12 paragraphs. Page 1 of 2. Jump to page 1 2

先秦两汉 - Pre-Qin and Han

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道家 - Daoism

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庄子 - Zhuangzi

[Warring States] 350 BC-250 BC
Books referencing 《庄子》 Library Resources
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[Also known as: 《南华真经》]

内篇 - Inner Chapters

English translation: James Legge [?] Library Resources

逍遥游 - Enjoyment in Untroubled Ease

English translation: James Legge [?]
Books referencing 《逍遥游》 Library Resources
6 逍遥游:
惠子谓庄子曰:“魏王贻我大瓠之种,我树之成而实五石,以盛水浆,其坚不能自举也。剖之以为瓢,则瓠落无所容。非不呺然大也,吾为其无用而掊之。”庄子曰:“夫子固拙于用大矣。宋人有善为不龟手之药者,世世以洴澼纩为事。客闻之,请买其方百金。聚族而谋曰:‘我世世为洴澼纩,不过数金;今一朝而鬻技百金,请与之。’客得之,以说吴王。越有难,吴王使之将。冬,与越人水战,大败越人,裂地而封之。能不龟手一也,或以封,或不免于洴澼纩,则所用之异也。今子有五石之瓠,何不虑以为大樽而浮乎江湖,而忧其瓠落无所容?则夫子犹有蓬之心也夫!”
Enjoyment in Untroubled Ease:...:
Huizi told Zhuangzi, saying, 'The king of Wei sent me some seeds of a large calabash, which I sowed. The fruit, when fully grown, could contain five piculs (of anything). I used it to contain water, but it was so heavy that I could not lift it by myself. I cut it in two to make the parts into drinking vessels; but the dried shells were too wide and unstable and would not hold (the liquor); nothing but large useless things! Because of their uselessness I knocked them to pieces.' Zhuangzi replied, 'You were indeed stupid, my master, in the use of what was large. There was a man of Song who was skilful at making a salve which kept the hands from getting chapped; and (his family) for generations had made the bleaching of cocoon-silk their business. A stranger heard of it, and proposed to buy the art of the preparation for a hundred ounces of silver. The kindred all came together, and considered the proposal. "We have," said they, "been bleaching cocoon-silk for generations, and have only gained a little money. Now in one morning we can sell to this man our art for a hundred ounces - let him have it." The stranger accordingly got it and went away with it to give counsel to the king of Wu, who was then engaged in hostilities with Yue. The king gave him the command of his fleet, and in the winter he had an engagement with that of Yue, on which he inflicted a great defeat, and was invested with a portion of territory taken from Yue. The keeping the hands from getting chapped was the same in both cases; but in the one case it led to the investiture (of the possessor of the salve), and in the other it had only enabled its owners to continue their bleaching. The difference of result was owing to the different use made of the art. Now you, Sir, had calabashes large enough to hold five piculs; why did you not think of making large bottle-gourds of them, by means of which you could have floated over rivers and lakes, instead of giving yourself the sorrow of finding that they were useless for holding anything. Your mind, my master, would seem to have been closed against all intelligence!'

Fox, Alan, "Reflex and Reflectivity: Wuwei in the Zhuangzi": P.61 [先秦] [汉后] Show property details

7 逍遥游:
惠子谓庄子曰:“吾有大树,人谓之樗。其大本拥肿而不中绳墨,其小枝卷曲而不中规矩,立之涂,匠者不顾。今子之言,大而无用,众所同去也。”庄子曰:“子独不见狸狌乎?卑身而伏,以候敖者;东西跳梁,不避高下;中于机辟,死于罔罟。今夫斄牛,其大若垂天之云。此能为大矣,而不能执鼠。今子有大树,患其无用,何不树之于无何有之乡,广莫之野,彷徨乎无为其侧,逍遥乎寝卧其下?不夭斤斧,物无害者,无所可用,安所困苦哉!”
Enjoyment in Untroubled Ease:...:
Huizi said to Zhuangzi, 'I have a large tree, which men call the Ailantus. Its trunk swells out to a large size, but is not fit for a carpenter to apply his line to it; its smaller branches are knotted and crooked, so that the disk and square cannot be used on them. Though planted on the wayside, a builder would not turn his head to look at it. Now your words, Sir, are great, but of no use - all unite in putting them away from them.' Zhuangzi replied, 'Have you never seen a wildcat or a weasel? There it lies, crouching and low, till the wanderer approaches; east and west it leaps about, avoiding neither what is high nor what is low, till it is caught in a trap, or dies in a net. Again there is the Yak, so large that it is like a cloud hanging in the sky. It is large indeed, but it cannot catch mice. You, Sir, have a large tree and are troubled because it is of no use - why do you not plant it in a tract where there is nothing else, or in a wide and barren wild? There you might saunter idly by its side, or in the enjoyment of untroubled ease sleep beneath it. Neither bill nor axe would shorten its existence; there would be nothing to injure it. What is there in its uselessness to cause you distress?'

Fox, Alan, "Reflex and Reflectivity: Wuwei in the Zhuangzi": P.60 [先秦] [汉后] Show property details

齐物论 - The Adjustment of Controversies

English translation: James Legge [?]
Books referencing 《齐物论》 Library Resources
2 齐物论:
大知闲闲,小知闲闲;大言炎炎,小言詹詹。其寐也魂交,其觉也形开,与接为构,日以心鬭。缦者,窖者,密者。小恐惴惴,大恐缦缦。其发若机栝,其司是非之谓也;其留如诅盟,其守胜之谓也;其杀如秋冬,以言其日消也;其溺之所为之,不可使复之也;其厌也如缄,以言其老洫也;近死之心,莫使复阳也。喜怒哀乐,虑叹变慹,姚佚启态;乐出虚,蒸成菌。日夜相代乎前,而莫知其所萌。已乎已乎!旦暮得此,其所由以生乎!
The Adjustment of Controversies:...:
Great knowledge is wide and comprehensive; small knowledge is partial and restricted. Great speech is exact and complete; small speech is (merely) so much talk. When we sleep, the soul communicates with (what is external to us); when we awake, the body is set free. Our intercourse with others then leads to various activity, and daily there is the striving of mind with mind. There are hesitancies; deep difficulties; reservations; small apprehensions causing restless distress, and great apprehensions producing endless fears. Where their utterances are like arrows from a bow, we have those who feel it their charge to pronounce what is right and what is wrong; where they are given out like the conditions of a covenant, we have those who maintain their views, determined to overcome. (The weakness of their arguments), like the decay (of things) in autumn and winter, shows the failing (of the minds of some) from day to day; or it is like their water which, once voided, cannot be gathered up again. Then their ideas seem as if fast bound with cords, showing that the mind is become like an old and dry moat, and that it is nigh to death, and cannot be restored to vigour and brightness. Joy and anger, sadness and pleasure, anticipation and regret, fickleness and fixedness, vehemence and indolence, eagerness and tardiness;-- (all these moods), like music from an empty tube, or mushrooms from the warm moisture, day and night succeed to one another and come before us, and we do not know whence they sprout. Let us stop! Let us stop! Can we expect to find out suddenly how they are produced?

Fox, Alan, "Reflex and Reflectivity: Wuwei in the Zhuangzi": P.66 [先秦] [汉后] Show property details
Fox, Alan, "Reflex and Reflectivity: Wuwei in the Zhuangzi": P.63 [先秦] [汉后] Show property details

4 齐物论:
夫随其成心而师之,谁独且无师乎?奚必知代而心自取者有之?愚者与有焉。未成乎心而有是非,是今日适越而昔至也。是以无有为有。无有为有,虽有神禹,且不能知,吾独且柰何哉!夫言非吹也。言者有言,其所言者特未定也。果有言邪?其未尝有言邪?其以为异于鷇音,亦有辩乎,其无辩乎?道恶乎隐而有真伪?言恶乎隐而有是非?道恶乎往而不存?言恶乎存而不可?道隐于小成,言隐于荣华。故有儒、墨之是非,以是其所非,而非其所是。欲是其所非而非其所是,则莫若以明。
The Adjustment of Controversies:...:
If we were to follow the judgments of the predetermined mind, who would be left alone and without a teacher? Not only would it be so with those who know the sequences (of knowledge and feeling) and make their own selection among them, but it would be so as well with the stupid and unthinking. For one who has not this determined mind, to have his affirmations and negations is like the case described in the saying, 'He went to Yue to-day, and arrived at it yesterday.' It would be making what was not a fact to be a fact. But even the spirit-like Yu could not have known how to do this, and how should one like me be able to do it? But speech is not like the blowing (of the wind); the speaker has (a meaning in) his words. If, however, what he says, be indeterminate (as from a mind not made up), does he then really speak or not? He thinks that his words are different from the chirpings of fledgelings; but is there any distinction between them or not? But how can the Dao be so obscured, that there should be 'a True' and 'a False' in it? How can speech be so obscured that there should be 'the Right' and 'the Wrong' about them? Where shall the Dao go to that it will not be found? Where shall speech be found that it will be inappropriate? Dao becomes obscured through the small comprehension (of the mind), and speech comes to be obscure through the vain-gloriousness (of the speaker). So it is that we have the contentions between the Literati and the Mohists, the one side affirming what the other denies, and vice versa. If we would decide on their several affirmations and denials, no plan is like bringing the (proper) light (of the mind) to bear on them.

Fox, Alan, "Reflex and Reflectivity: Wuwei in the Zhuangzi": P.65 [先秦] [汉后] Show property details

5 齐物论:
物无非彼,物无非是。自彼则不见,自知则知之。故曰:彼出于是,是亦因彼。彼是,方生之说也。虽然,方生方死,方死方生;方可方不可,方不可方可;因是因非,因非因是。是以圣人不由,而照之于天,亦因是也。是亦彼也,彼亦是也。彼亦一是非,此亦一是非。果且有彼是乎哉?果且无彼是乎哉?彼是莫得其偶,谓之道枢。枢始得其环中,以应无穷。是亦一无穷,非亦一无穷也。故曰“莫若以明”。
The Adjustment of Controversies:...:
There is no thing that is not "that", and there is no thing that is not "this". If I look at something from "that", I do not see it; only if I look at it from knowing do I know it. Hence it is said, 'That view comes from this; and this view is a consequence of that:' - which is the theory that that view and this (the opposite views) produce each the other. Although it be so, there is affirmed now life and now death; now death and now life; now the admissibility of a thing and now its inadmissibility; now its inadmissibility and now its admissibility. (The disputants) now affirm and now deny; now deny and now affirm. Therefore the sagely man does not pursue this method, but views things in the light of (his) Heaven (-ly nature), and hence forms his judgment of what is right. This view is the same as that, and that view is the same as this. But that view involves both a right and a wrong; and this view involves also a right and a wrong - are there indeed the two views, that and this? Or are there not the two views, that and this? They have not found their point of correspondency which is called the pivot of the Dao. As soon as one finds this pivot, he stands in the centre of the ring (of thought), where he can respond without end to the changing views; without end to those affirming, and without end to those denying. Therefore I said, 'There is nothing like the proper light (of the mind).'

Fox, Alan, "Reflex and Reflectivity: Wuwei in the Zhuangzi": P.64 [先秦] [汉后] Show property details

6 齐物论:
以指喻指之非指,不若以非指喻指之非指也;以马喻马之非马,不若以非马喻马之非马也。天地,一指也;万物,一马也。
可乎可,不可乎不可。道行之而成,物谓之而然。恶乎然?然于然。恶乎不然?不然于不然。物固有所然,物固有所可。无物不然,无物不可。故为是举莛与楹,厉与西施,恢恑憰怪,道通为一。
其分也,成也;其成也,毁也。凡物无成与毁,复通为一。唯达者知通为一,为是不用而寓诸庸。庸也者,用也;用也者,通也;通也者,得也。适得而几矣。因是已。已而不知其然,谓之道。劳神明为一,而不知其同也,谓之朝三。何谓朝三?曰狙公赋芧,曰:“朝三而莫四。”众狙皆怒。曰:“然则朝四而莫三。”众狙皆悦。名实未亏,而喜怒为用,亦因是也。是以圣人和之以是非,而休乎天钧,是之谓两行。
The Adjustment of Controversies:...:
By means of a finger (of my own) to illustrate that the finger (of another) is not a finger is not so good a plan as to illustrate that it is not so by means of what is (acknowledged to be) not a finger; and by means of (what I call) a horse to illustrate that (what another calls) a horse is not so, is not so good a plan as to illustrate that it is not a horse, by means of what is (acknowledged to be) not a horse. (All things in) heaven and earth may be (dealt with as) a finger; (each of) their myriads may be (dealt with as) a horse.
Does a thing seem so to me? (I say that) it is so. Does it seem not so to me? (I say that) it is not so. A path is formed by (constant) treading on the ground. A thing is called by its name through the (constant) application of the name to it. How is it so? It is so because it is so. How is it not so? It is not so, because it is not so. Everything has its inherent character and its proper capability. There is nothing which has not these. Therefore, this being so, if we take a stalk of grain and a (large) pillar, a loathsome (leper) and (a beauty like) Xi Shi, things large and things insecure, things crafty and things strange; they may in the light of the Dao all be reduced to the same category (of opinion about them).
It was separation that led to completion; from completion ensued dissolution. But all things, without regard to their completion and dissolution, may again be comprehended in their unity - it is only the far reaching in thought who know how to comprehend them in this unity. This being so, let us give up our devotion to our own views, and occupy ourselves with the ordinary views. These ordinary views are grounded on the use of things. (The study of that) use leads to the comprehensive judgment, and that judgment secures the success (of the inquiry). That success gained, we are near (to the object of our search), and there we stop. When we stop, and yet we do not know how it is so, we have what is called the Dao. When we toil our spirits and intelligence, obstinately determined (to establish our own view), and do not know the agreement (which underlies it and the views of others), we have what is called 'In the morning three.' What is meant by that 'In the morning three?' A keeper of monkeys, in giving them out their acorns, (once) said, 'In the morning I will give you three (measures) and in the evening four.' This made them all angry, and he said, 'Very well. In the morning I will give you four and in the evening three.' The monkeys were all pleased. His two proposals were substantially the same, but the result of the one was to make the creatures angry, and of the other to make them pleased - an illustration of the point I am insisting on. Therefore the sagely man brings together a dispute in its affirmations and denials, and rests in the equal fashioning of Heaven. Both sides of the question are admissible.

Fox, Alan, "Reflex and Reflectivity: Wuwei in the Zhuangzi": P.69 [先秦] [汉后] Show property details

养生主 - Nourishing the Lord of Life

English translation: James Legge [?]
Books referencing 《养生主》 Library Resources
2 养生主:
丁为文惠君解牛,手之所触,肩之所倚,足之所履,膝之所踦,砉然向然,奏刀騞然,莫不中音。合于《桑林》之舞,乃中《经首》之会。文惠君曰:“嘻!善哉!技盖至此乎?”庖丁释刀对曰:“臣之所好者道也,进乎技矣。始臣之解牛之时,所见无非牛者。三年之后,未尝见全牛也。方今之时,臣以神遇,而不以目视,官知止而神欲行。依乎天理,批大郤,导大窾,因其固然。技经肯綮之未尝,而况大軱乎!良庖岁更刀,割也;族庖月更刀,折也。今臣之刀十九年矣,所解数千牛矣,而刀刃若新发于硎。彼节者有间,而刀刃者无厚,以无厚入有间,恢恢乎其于游刃必有馀地矣,是以十九年而刀刃若新发于硎。虽然,每至于族,吾见其难为,怵然为戒,视为止,行为迟。动刀甚微,謋然已解,如土委地。提刀而立,为之四顾,为之踌躇满志,善刀而藏之。”文惠君曰:“善哉!吾闻庖丁之言,得养生焉。”
Nourishing the Lord of...:
His cook was cutting up an ox for the ruler Wen Hui. Whenever he applied his hand, leaned forward with his shoulder, planted his foot, and employed the pressure of his knee, in the audible ripping off of the skin, and slicing operation of the knife, the sounds were all in regular cadence. Movements and sounds proceeded as in the dance of 'the Mulberry Forest' and the blended notes of the King Shou.' The ruler said, 'Ah! Admirable! That your art should have become so perfect!' (Having finished his operation), the cook laid down his knife, and replied to the remark, 'What your servant loves is the method of the Dao, something in advance of any art. When I first began to cut up an ox, I saw nothing but the (entire) carcase. After three years I ceased to see it as a whole. Now I deal with it in a spirit-like manner, and do not look at it with my eyes. The use of my senses is discarded, and my spirit acts as it wills. Observing the natural lines, (my knife) slips through the great crevices and slides through the great cavities, taking advantage of the facilities thus presented. My art avoids the membranous ligatures, and much more the great bones. A good cook changes his knife every year; (it may have been injured) in cutting - an ordinary cook changes his every month - (it may have been) broken. Now my knife has been in use for nineteen years; it has cut up several thousand oxen, and yet its edge is as sharp as if it had newly come from the whetstone. There are the interstices of the joints, and the edge of the knife has no (appreciable) thickness; when that which is so thin enters where the interstice is, how easily it moves along! The blade has more than room enough. Nevertheless, whenever I come to a complicated joint, and see that there will be some difficulty, I proceed anxiously and with caution, not allowing my eyes to wander from the place, and moving my hand slowly. Then by a very slight movement of the knife, the part is quickly separated, and drops like (a clod of) earth to the ground. Then standing up with the knife in my hand, I look all round, and in a leisurely manner, with an air of satisfaction, wipe it clean, and put it in its sheath.' The ruler Wen Hui said, 'Excellent! I have heard the words of my cook, and learned from them the nourishment of (our) life.'

Fox, Alan, "Reflex and Reflectivity: Wuwei in the Zhuangzi": P.62 [先秦] [汉后] Show property details

人间世 - Man in the World, Associated with other Men

English translation: James Legge [?]
Books referencing 《人间世》 Library Resources
2 人间世:
颜回曰:“吾无以进矣,敢问其方。”仲尼曰:“斋,吾将语若!有而为之,其易邪?易之者,皞天不宜。”颜回曰:“回之家贫,唯不饮酒、不茹荤者数月矣。若此,则可以为斋乎?”曰:“是祭祀之斋,非心斋也。”回曰:“敢问心斋。”仲尼曰:“若一志,无听之以耳而听之以心,无听之以心而听之以气。听止于耳,心止于符。气也者,虚而待物者也。唯道集虚。虚者,心斋也。”颜回曰:“回之未始得使,实自回也;得使之也,未始有回也。可谓虚乎?”夫子曰:“尽矣。吾语若!若能入游其樊而无感其名,入则鸣,不入则止。无门无毒,一宅而寓于不得已,则几矣。绝迹易,无行地难。为人使,易以伪;为天使,难以伪。闻以有翼飞者矣,未闻以无翼飞者也;闻以有知知者矣,未闻以无知知者也。瞻彼阕者,虚室生白,吉祥止止。夫且不止,是之谓坐驰。夫徇耳目内通而外于心知,鬼神将来舍,而况人乎!是万物之化也,禹、舜之所纽也,伏戏、几蘧之所行终,而况散焉者乎!”
Man in the World,...:
Yan Hui said, 'I can go no farther; I venture to ask the method from you.' Zhongni replied, 'It is fasting, (as) I will tell you. (But) when you have the method, will you find it easy to practise it? He who thinks it easy will be disapproved of by the bright Heaven.' Hui said, 'My family is poor. For months together we have no spirituous drink, nor do we taste the proscribed food or any strong-smelling vegetables;-- can this be regarded as fasting?' The reply was, 'It is the fasting appropriate to sacrificing, but it is not the fasting of the mind.' 'I venture to ask what that fasting of the mind is,' said Hui, and Zhongni answered, 'Maintain a perfect unity in every movement of your will, You will not wait for the hearing of your ears about it, but for the hearing of your mind. You will not wait even for the hearing of your mind, but for the hearing of the spirit. Let the hearing (of the ears) rest with the ears. Let the mind rest in the verification (of the rightness of what is in the will). But the spirit is free from all pre-occupation and so waits for (the appearance of) things. Where the (proper) course is, there is freedom from all pre-occupation; such freedom is the fasting of the mind.' Hui said, 'Before it was possible for me to employ (this method), there I was, the Hui that I am; now, that I can employ it, the Hui that I was has passed away. Can I be said to have obtained this freedom from pre-occupation?' The Master replied, 'Entirely. I tell you that you can enter and be at ease in the enclosure (where he is), and not come into collision with the reputation (which belongs to him). If he listen to your counsels, let him hear your notes; if he will not listen, be silent. Open no (other) door; employ no other medicine; dwell with him (as with a friend) in the same apartment, and as if you had no other option, and you will not be far from success in your object. Not to move a step is easy; to walk without treading on the ground is difficult. In acting after the manner of men, it is easy to fall into hypocrisy; in acting after the manner of Heaven, it is difficult to play the hypocrite. I have heard of flying with wings; I have not heard of flying without them. I have heard of the knowledge of the wise; I have not heard of the knowledge of the unwise. Look at that aperture (left in the wall); the empty apartment is filled with light through it. Felicitous influences rest (in the mind thus emblemed), as in their proper resting place. Even when they do not so rest, we have what is called (the body) seated and (the mind) galloping abroad. The information that comes through the ears and eyes is comprehended internally, and the knowledge of the mind becomes something external: (when this is the case), the spiritual intelligences will come, and take up their dwelling with us, and how much more will other men do so! All things thus undergo a transforming influence. This was the hinge on which Yu and Shun moved; it was this which Fu-xi and Ji-qu practised all their lives: how much more should other men follow the same rule!'

Fox, Alan, "Reflex and Reflectivity: Wuwei in the Zhuangzi": P.66 [先秦] [汉后] Show property details

德充符 - The Seal of Virtue Complete

English translation: James Legge [?]
Books referencing 《德充符》 Library Resources
2 德充符:
申徒嘉,兀者也,而与郑子产同师于伯昏无人。子产谓申徒嘉曰:“我先出,则子止;子先出,则我止。”其明日,又与合堂同席而坐。子产谓申徒嘉曰:“我先出,则子止;子先出,则我止。今我将出,子可以止乎,其未邪?且子见执政而不违,子齐执政乎?”申徒嘉曰:“先生之门,固有执政焉如此哉?子而说子之执政而后人者也!闻之曰:‘鉴明则尘垢不止,止则不明也。久与贤人处,则无过。’今子之所取大者,先生也,而犹出言若是,不亦过乎!”子产曰:“子既若是矣,犹与尧争善,计子之德不足以自反邪?”申徒嘉曰:“自状其过以不当亡者众,不状其过以不当存者寡。知不可奈何而安之若命,惟有德者能之。游于羿之彀中,中央者,中地也,然而不中者,命也。人以其全足笑吾不全足者多矣。我怫然而怒,而适先生之所,则废然而反。不知先生之洗我以善邪!吾与夫子游十九年矣,而未尝知吾兀者也。今子与我游于形骸之内,而子索我于形骸之外,不亦过乎!”子产蹴然改容更貌曰:“子无乃称!”
The Seal of Virtue...:
Shen-tu Jia was (another) man who had lost his feet. Along with Zi-chan of Zheng he studied under the master Bo-hun Wu-ren. Zi-chan said to him (one day), 'If I go out first, do you remain behind; and if you go out first, I will remain behind.' Next day they were again sitting together on the same mat in the hall, when Zi-chan said (again), 'If I go out first, do you remain behind; and if you go out first, I will remain behind. Now I am about to go out; will you stay behind or not? Moreover, when you see one of official rank (like myself), you do not try to get out of his way - do you consider yourself equal to one of official rank?' Shen-tu Jia replied, 'In our Master's school is there indeed such recognition required of official rank? You are one, Sir, whose pleasure is in your official rank, and would therefore take precedence of other men. I have heard that when a mirror is bright, the dust does not rest on it; when dust rests on it the mirror is not bright. When one dwells long with a man of ability and virtue, he comes to be without error. There now is our teacher whom you have chosen to make you greater than you are; and when you still talk in this way, are you not in error?' Zi-chan rejoined, 'A (shattered) object as you are, you would still strive to make yourself out as good as Yao! If I may form an estimate of your virtue, might it not be sufficient to lead you to the examination of yourself?' The other said, 'Most criminals, in describing their offences, would make it out that they ought not to have lost (their feet) for them; few would describe them so as to make it appear that they should not have preserved their feet. They are only the virtuous who know that such a calamity was unavoidable, and therefore rest in it as what was appointed for them. When men stand before (an archer like) Yi with his bent bow, if they are in the middle of his field, that is the place where they should be hit; and if they be not hit, that also was appointed. There are many with their feet entire who laugh at me because I have lost my feet, which makes me feel vexed and angry. But when I go to our teacher, I throw off that feeling, and return (to a better mood) - he has washed, without my knowing it, the other from me by (his instructions in) what is good. I have attended him now for nineteen years, and have not known that I am without my feet. Now, you, Sir, and I have for the object of our study the (virtue) which is internal, and not an adjunct of the body, and yet you are continually directing your attention to my external body - are you not wrong in this?' Zi-chan felt uneasy, altered his manner and looks, and said, 'You need not, Sir, say anything more about it.'

Fox, Alan, "Reflex and Reflectivity: Wuwei in the Zhuangzi": P.65 [先秦] [汉后] Show property details

大宗师 - The Great and Most Honoured Master

English translation: James Legge [?]
Books referencing 《大宗师》 Library Resources
6 大宗师:
子桑户、孟子反、子琴张三人相与友,曰:“孰能相与于无相与,相为于无相为?孰能登天游雾,挠挑无极,相忘以生,无所终穷?”三人相视而笑,莫逆于心,遂相与友。莫然有闲,而子桑户死,未葬。孔子闻之,使子贡往侍事焉。或编曲,或鼓琴,相和而歌曰:“嗟来桑户乎!嗟来桑户乎!而已反其真,而我犹为人猗!”子贡趋而进曰:“敢问临尸而歌,礼乎?”二人相视而笑,曰:“是恶知礼意!”子贡反,以告孔子曰:“彼何人者邪?修行无有,而外其形骸,临尸而歌,颜色不变,无以命之。彼何人者邪?”孔子曰:“彼游方之外者也,而丘游方之内者也。外内不相及,而丘使女往吊之,丘则陋矣。彼方且与造物者为人,而游乎天地之一气。彼以生为附赘县疣,以死为决𤴯溃痈。夫若然者,又恶知死生先后之所在!假于异物,托于同体,忘其肝胆,遗其耳目,反覆终始,不知端倪,芒然彷徨乎尘垢之外,逍遥乎无为之业。彼又恶能愦愦然为世俗之礼,以观众人之耳目哉!”子贡曰:“然则夫子何方之依?”孔子曰:“丘,天之戮民也。虽然,吾与汝共之。”子贡曰:“敢问其方。”孔子曰:“鱼相造乎水,人相造乎道。相造乎水者,穿池而养给;相造乎道者,无事而生定。故曰:鱼相忘乎江湖,人相忘乎道术。”子贡曰:“敢问畸人。”曰:“畸人者,畸于人而侔于天。故曰:天之小人,人之君子;人之君子,天之小人也。”
The Great and Most...:
Zi-sang Hu, Meng Zi-fan, and Zi-qin Zhang, these three men, were friends together. (One of them said), 'Who can associate together without any (thought of) such association, or act together without any (evidence of) such co-operation? Who can mount up into the sky and enjoy himself amidst the mists, disporting beyond the utmost limits (of things), and forgetting all others as if this were living, and would have no end?' The three men looked at one another and laughed, not perceiving the drift of the questions; and they continued to associate together as friends. Suddenly, after a time, Zi-sang Hu died. Before he was buried, Confucius heard of the event, and sent Zi-gong to go and see if he could render any assistance. One of the survivors had composed a ditty, and the other was playing on his lute. Then they sang together in unison,
'Ah! come, Sang Hu! ah! come, Sang Hu!
Your being true you've got again,
While we, as men, still here remain
Ohone!'
Zi-gong hastened forward to them, and said, 'I venture to ask whether it be according to the rules to be singing thus in the presence of the corpse?' The two men looked at each other, and laughed, saying, 'What does this man know about the idea that underlies (our) rules?' Zi-gong returned to Confucius, and reported to him, saying, 'What sort of men are those? They had made none of the usual preparations, and treated the body as a thing foreign to them. They were singing in the presence of the corpse, and there was no change in their countenances. I cannot describe them; what sort of men are they?' Confucius replied, 'Those men occupy and enjoy themselves in what is outside the (common) ways (of the world), while I occupy and enjoy myself in what lies within those ways. There is no common ground for those of such different ways; and when I sent you to condole with those men, I was acting stupidly. They, moreover, make man to be the fellow of the Creator, and seek their enjoyment in the formless condition of heaven and earth. They consider life to be an appendage attached, an excrescence annexed to them, and death to be a separation of the appendage and a dispersion of the contents of the excrescence. With these views, how should they know wherein death and life are to be found, or what is first and what is last? They borrow different substances, and pretend that the common form of the body is composed of them. They dismiss the thought of (its inward constituents like) the liver and gall, and (its outward constituents), the ears and eyes. Again and again they end and they begin, having no knowledge of first principles. They occupy themselves ignorantly and vaguely with what (they say) lies outside the dust and dirt (of the world), and seek their enjoyment in the business of doing nothing. How should they confusedly address themselves to the ceremonies practised by the common people, and exhibit themselves as doing so to the ears and eyes of the multitude?'
Zi-gong said, 'Yes, but why do you, Master, act according to the (common) ways (of the world)?' The reply was, 'I am in this under the condemning sentence of Heaven. Nevertheless, I will share with you (what I have attained to).' Zi-gong rejoined, 'I venture to ask the method which you pursue;' and Confucius said, 'Fishes breed and grow in the water; man developes in the Dao. Growing in the water, the fishes cleave the pools, and their nourishment is supplied to them. Developing in the Dao, men do nothing, and the enjoyment of their life is secured. Hence it is said, "Fishes forget one another in the rivers and lakes; men forget one another in the arts of the Dao."'
Zi-gong said, 'I venture to ask about the man who stands aloof from others.' The reply was, 'He stands aloof from other men, but he is in accord with Heaven! Hence it is said, "The small man of Heaven is the superior man among men; the superior man among men is the small man of Heaven!"'

Fox, Alan, "Reflex and Reflectivity: Wuwei in the Zhuangzi": P.60-61 [先秦] [汉后] Show property details

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