Follow us on Facebook to receive important updates Follow us on Twitter to receive important updates Follow us on sina.com's microblogging site to receive important updates Follow us on Douban to receive important updates
Chinese Text Project
Show translation:[None] [English]
Show statistics Edit searchSearch details:
Scope: The Seal of Virtue Complete Request type: Paragraph
Condition 1: Contains text "悶然而後應氾而若辭" Matched:1.
Total 1 paragraphs. Page 1 of 1.

德充符 - The Seal of Virtue Complete

English translation: James Legge [?]
Books referencing 《德充符》 Library Resources
4 德充符:
魯哀公問於仲尼曰:「衛有惡人焉,曰哀駘它。丈夫與之處者,思而不能去也。婦人見之,請於父母曰『與為人妻,寧為夫子妾』者,十數而未止也。未嘗有聞其唱者也,常和而已矣。無君人之位以濟乎人之死,無聚祿以望人之腹。又以惡駭天下,和而不唱,知不出乎四域,且而雌雄合乎前。是必有異乎人者也。寡人召而觀之,果以惡駭天下。與寡人處,不至以月數,而寡人有意乎其為人也;不至乎期年,而寡人信之。國無宰,寡人傳國焉。悶然而後應,氾而若辭。寡人醜乎,卒授之國。無幾何也,去寡人而行,寡人卹焉若有亡也,若無與樂是國也。是何人者也?」仲尼曰:「丘也,嘗使於楚矣,適見㹠子食於其死母者,少焉眴若,皆棄之而走。不見己焉爾,不得類焉爾。所愛其母者,非愛其形也,愛使其形者也。戰而死者,其人之葬也,不以翣資,刖者之屨,無為愛之,皆無其本矣。為天子之諸御,不爪翦,不穿耳;娶妻者止於外,不得復使。形全猶足以為爾,而況全德之人乎!今哀駘它未言而信,無功而親,使人授己國,唯恐其不受也,是必才全而德不形者也。」哀公曰:「何謂才全?」仲尼曰:「死生存亡,窮達貧富,賢與不肖,毀譽、饑渴、寒暑,是事之變,命之行也;日夜相代乎前,而知不能規乎其始者也。故不足以滑和,不可入於靈府。使之和豫通而不失於兌,使日夜無郤而與物為春,是接而生時於心者也。是之謂才全。」「何謂德不形?」曰:「平者,水停之盛也。其可以為法也,內保之而外不蕩也。德者,成和之修也。德不形者,物不能離也。」哀公異日以告閔子曰:「始也,吾以南面而君天下,執民之紀,而憂其死,吾自以為至通矣。今吾聞至人之言,恐吾無其實,輕用吾身而亡其國。吾與孔丘,非君臣也,德友而已矣。」
The Seal of Virtue...:
Duke Ai of Lu asked Zhongni, saying, 'There was an ugly man in Wei, called Ai-tai Tuo. His father-in-law, who lived with him, thought so much of him that he could not be away from him. His wife, when she saw him (ugly as he was), represented to her parents, saying, "I had more than ten times rather be his concubine than the wife of any other man." He was never heard to take the lead in discussion, but always seemed to be of the same opinion with others. He had not the position of a ruler, so as to be able to save men from death. He had no revenues, so as to be able to satisfy men's craving for food. He was ugly enough, moreover, to scare the whole world. He agreed with men instead of trying to lead them to adopt his views; his knowledge did not go beyond his immediate neighbourhood. And yet his father-in-law and his wife were of one mind about him in his presence (as I have said) - he must have been different from other men. I called him, and saw him. Certainly he was ugly enough to scare the whole world. He had not lived with me, however, for many months, when I was drawn to the man; and before he had been with me a full year, I had confidence in him. The state being without a chief minister, I (was minded) to commit the government to him. He responded to my proposal sorrowfully, and looked undecided as if he would fain have declined it. I was ashamed of myself (as inferior to him), but finally gave the government into his hands. In a little time, however, he left me and went away. I was sorry and felt that I had sustained a loss, and as if there were no other to share the pleasures of the kingdom with me. What sort of man was he?'
Zhongni said, 'Once when I was sent on a mission to Qi, I saw some pigs sucking at their dead mother. After a little they looked with rapid glances, when they all left her, and ran away. They felt that she did not see them, and that she was no longer like themselves. What they had loved in their mother was not her bodily figure, but what had given animation to her figure. When a man dies in battle, they do not at his interment employ the usual appendages of plumes: as to supplying shoes to one who has lost his feet, there is no reason why he should care for them - in neither case is there the proper reason for their use. The members of the royal harem do not pare their nails nor pierce their ears; when a man is newly married, he remains (for a time) absent from his official duties, and unoccupied with them. That their bodies might be perfect was sufficient to make them thus dealt with; how much greater results should be expected from men whose mental gifts are perfect! This Ai-tai Tuo was believed by men, though he did not speak a word; and was loved by them, though he did no special service for them. He made men appoint him to the government of their states, afraid only that he would not accept the appointment. He must have been a man whose powers were perfect, though his realisation of them was not manifested in his person.
Duke Ai said, 'What is meant by saying that his powers were complete?' Zhongni replied, 'Death and life, preservation and ruin, failure and success, poverty and wealth, superiority and inferiority, blame and praise, hunger and thirst, cold and heat; these are the changes of circumstances, the operation of our appointed lot. Day and night they succeed to one another before us, but there is no wisdom able to discover to what they owe their origination. They are not sufficient therefore to disturb the harmony (of the nature), and are not allowed to enter into the treasury of intelligence. To cause this harmony and satisfaction ever to be diffused, while the feeling of pleasure is not lost from the mind; to allow no break to arise in this state day or night, so that it is always spring-time in his relations with external things; in all his experiences to realise in his mind what is appropriate to each season (of the year): these are the characteristics of him whose powers are perfect.'
'And what do you mean by the realisation of these powers not being manifested in the person?' (pursued further the duke). The reply was, 'There is nothing so level as the surface of a pool of still water. It may serve as an example of what I mean. All within its circuit is preserved (in peace), and there comes to it no agitation from without. The virtuous efficacy is the perfect cultivation of the harmony (of the nature). Though the realisation of this be not manifested in the person, things cannot separate themselves (from its influence).'
Some days afterwards duke Ai told this conversation to Min-zi, saying, 'Formerly it seemed to me the work of the sovereign to stand in court with his face to the south, to rule the kingdom, and to pay good heed to the accounts of the people concerned, lest any should come to a (miserable) death - this I considered to be the sum (of his duty). Now that I have heard that description of the Perfect man, I fear that my idea is not the real one, and that, by employing myself too lightly, I may cause the ruin of my state. I and Kong Qiu are not on the footing of ruler and subject, but on that of a virtuous friendship.'

Total 1 paragraphs. Page 1 of 1.